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<Chris Rose>
posted
Does anyone know about Loblolly Pine? (N.C. variety?) When climbing and taking down, what are the largest sections that can be lowered/dropped? Has anyone out there lowered a 12' piece???
 
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<MICHAEL STARNER>
posted
Reply to post by Chris Rose, on November 26, 2000 at 16:04:27:

A loblolly pine weighs about 53lbs. per square ft. on average. It depends on the diameter,however a 12' peice at 2 ft. in diameter would weigh about 1,992 lbs. Thats not adding the shock load. Depending on your trees diameter you might want to take it smaller.

source:ANSI Z133.1-1994 PROPOSED REVISION
http://www.2champaign.isa- arbor.com/ANSI133/
 
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<Chris Rose>
posted
Reply to post by Chris Rose, on November 26, 2000 at 16:04:27:

Thanks for the info. I only ask because someone told me he actually watched somebody chunking out a tree in 12 foot sections, although the lowering rigging must have been attached above (crane/another tree?)and not attached to the same tree itself. I'm not saying it's impossible, but...
 
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<Reed Holt>
posted
Reply to post by MICHAEL STARNER, on November 26, 2000 at 16:04:27:


Chunking it down - the twelve-foot pieces you mention - why? Logs are usable in 10ft4inches, 12.4, 14.4, etc. The toll on the climber (i.e.:
by staying too long) up there I could understand the reasoning behind chunking-down such large sections however - the danger in the weights and uncontrollable drops (roped or freefall) and handling once on the ground - why?
It's safer to keep everything in sections small enough to handle on the ground, load individually, and control drop direction better. The dangers of a wayward 12-foot section outweigh common sense and safety.
Tree weight also varies in extremes determined by seasonal conditions - droubt, winter, health, etc. Cubic foot calculations vary for weights due to these.
I found it much easier to chunk in 1.5 - 2 foot sections - no need to notch (cut right through) then control drop - makes it easier and safer for ground crew as well.
 
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<Reed again>
posted
Reply to post by Reed Holt, on December 03, 2000 at 00:38:32:


Opps, forgot - I chunked-down to the 28-26-24-20foot log remaining and those were assessed for timber value, free-felled if possible.

Thanks,
Reed
 
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<Chris Rose>
posted
Reply to post by Reed Holt, on December 03, 2000 at 00:38:32:

Thanks Reed (and everyone else who responded), I was really posing the question in this forum because somebody told me that the climbers in this particular company would chunk down a tree in twelve foot increments, which I found hard to believe. I've climbed trees and lowered some, but nothing like the pieces of wood mentioned! I was just curious if anyone else had heard of such a thing?! Thanks again.
 
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