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<Reed Holt>
posted
I know below we had a short dialogue about the 020, and more than a few people are displaced as to it's price which has come down a bit porportionately in the last 20 years and I even defended the damn tool adamantly because it WAS the best climbing saw around but hell, I want to add a couple of new frustrations with it.

First off, it looses power all the time. Sure, it's free to have it serviced for the first year but it's in the shop as much as it's up the tree with me. The carb's been changed. The fuel/oil ratio all my other saws drink choke-out the 020 - the exhaust gets clogged. They cheapened the case (re:WalMart type of mass production) and overall it pales in comparison to the climbing able Huskies and even the cheap crappy Echo's as far as dependability goes.

If I could go back and get my money returned, I would've bought three Echos or two Huskies. When I told my dealer about this, he wanted to show me the "new and improved" Stihl climber's saw - the "200T Super Pro", again, a costly experiment and I'm tired of being the guinea pig, it's getting too expensive.

So take heed fellow climbers, don't go where I've been. The Norweigens and Swedes are far more dedicated to us than the Germans are now. The quest for economic superiority often leaves the working man screwed. And another tidbit - Mercedes no longer means quality, it's only a symbol and if a client drives one, I charge more. I call it the pucker factor.

Be good and don't hurry your work,
Reed
 
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<Guy>
posted
Reply to post by Reed Holt, on January 28, 2002 at 10:36:42:

Couldn't agree more on the 020T EXPERIENCE.
Spent $650 on the first one which lasted well under three years. Bought a second one and in less than 2 yrs the shop said it was junk. "Runs good until it warms up" they said. Shrug.
these are the same guys who sold it to me.

Apparently they're less willing to tinker w the carb, etc. than Reed's guys. For an engine made of a new alloy that was supposed to last, they failed to live up to that billing.

So I bought the husky which is much noisier and harder to start. I'd relegated the Echo to brush work but I think it's going back up the tree next.
Anyone have a topping--oops, climbing--saw they like?
 
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<JPS>
posted
Reply to post by Guy, on January 28, 2002 at 10:36:42:

I still like the 020 over the 335xpt. I think it cutts better.

The 200m is not much different then the 020, they even put the High needle back on the carb.

Heard they brough the list price down too.
 
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<Bob Underwood>
posted
Reply to post by jps, on January 30, 2002 at 06:55:33:

Have two old 015's that still cut like new.

Also a collection of 3 old saws, plastic case remington, craftsman poulan 25, and one with no name on it, that I got for carrying out of local shops since they did not run. All work fine now. In every case a hose was pinched when the case was put back on at some time, shutting off either the gas or oiler. As far as best value for the money, these are the ones. $0 purchase price and about 6 years use so far.
 
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<Reed>
posted
Reply to post by Bob Underwood, on January 30, 2002 at 21:30:55:

I Like your style professor Underwood - salvage and reserve. Down here in Texas (consumer's paradise) everything's new. Can't even find an old pick-up anymore for under $1,000.

Image is too important I guess. That South Carolina company I work with occassionally had over 30 saws for four people - no one could even rat-tail file a chain, just go and buy a pre-length. Their tool shed had dozens of "retired" saws, many under a year old. All the time spent drinking beer after work could've been used on the workbench. Simple skills I wonder about - like growing-up on the farm/orchard: we welded, sanded, painted, hammered, and screwed (a pun intended). Nowadays one just goes to Home Depot to buy more of the kind of mass produced crap that can't be fixed, so I guess we consumed our way into this marketing madness, only lamenting back to the days when people could think more productively. Reminds me of the "war" effort being asked.....just go out and buy something, it's suppossed to make us feel better.

I guess being a "salvager" has it's advantages when put against the American way of purchase to win mentality. Used equipment is worthless when one is influenced into buying the "new and improved" version, and we'll have more crap to select from. A $100,000 bucket truck four years old can be had for $12,000 to $21,000. I don't feel sorry for the arborist who files chapter 7 when he's amassed 1/4 million dollars worth of ISA trade show goodies.

WE ought to post pics of our antiques, trade and barter too.

Keep warm Bob, Spring's out there somewhere soon.

Reed
 
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<JPS>
posted
Reply to post by Reed, on February 01, 2002 at 11:05:39:

Arboristsite.com has a chainsaw board inhabited by collectors, racers, loggers...

The get into discussions on the difference in performance of a coined cutter link and a ground ground link.

Got guys talking about "racing tuned" chain.

Mostly it is bragging about this saw or that or how many they have. There working on setting up an auction and parts page too.
 
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<Bob Underwood>
posted
Reply to post by Reed, on February 01, 2002 at 11:05:39:

Reed,

I sold my 74 Chevy pickup this past summer for $250, exactly what I paid for it 7 years ago. It was lacking a little paint and metal, had a big deer head and the words "Buck Fever" on the hood, and a clutch that held fine with no load, but an empty boat trailer would bring a whiff of smoke, but started every day even at -30 with no block heater.

Don't be too hard on your ex coworkers, where do you think the recycled aluminum comes from for the new saws?

By the way, spring arrived today. +25F, sun shining, no wind, sunbathers in the back yards, what more could you want?

Bob
 
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<Reed>
posted
Reply to post by JPS, on February 02, 2002 at 08:14:38:

Thank you John, the arborist's site is a good one, I've seen it in the past but forgot about it when i replaced my machine.

On the 020, I spent the entire morning yesterday dissecting it on my kitchen table. I noticed the warranty work done from my dealer included missing parts and fasteners not tightened, I should have seen that coming when I noticed his ad in the classifieds of our small town weekly paper looking for a "farm equipment tech with experience" offering $6.50 per hour - this person obviously was the one who serviced my saw. Low pay gets what you deserve. However, I didn't deserve it. Those cheap deceptive jerks.....no different than Enron, the new American way.

It ran super yesterday afternoon - the spark arrester I removed - it's the Archilles' heel. The problem with carbon build-up is in the carb, but it affects output pressure. Remove your screens and the saw will perform as it should. In fact, I'm removing screens from all the saws, warranty violations don't matter anymore, as the warranty work threatens my saws more than factory defects anyway. One-pull starts again and power for the live-oak removals, especially 60 feet up and in no emotional position to sweat over a piece of junk in my hands.

I'm going to get my $450 worth out of that saw in the end, in spite of America and it's mad marketing mentality.
 
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<Nickrosis>
posted
Reply to post by Reed, on February 02, 2002 at 10:58:31:

I think a major component in your relationship with your saw is your dealer! The dealer that I've dealt with has always done an excellent job and cares a lot about their customers. I realize that we may have a lot influence with our volume, but I see them treat other customers well, too.

In fact, the only reason our company relies on Stihl is the dealer. If there were a good Husky dealer in the area, we would be entirely outfitted in Husky saws. It's all about the dealer, baby.

Nickrosis
Student Society of Arboriculture - University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point
Check out our weekly survey! This week, enter your favorite climbing rope and see the results immediately. Enter at www.uwsp.edu/stuorg/ssa.
 
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<Reed>
posted
Reply to post by Nickrosis, on February 03, 2002 at 07:58:55:

You're probably correct on this point. After many hours spent dissecting and modifying my Stihls on the kitchen table, they finally seem to be working right.

Our local dealer is nothing but a high-volume, heavy profit, and cheap labor WalMArt style of marketer. He pushes the new line models (example: the "300") and thinks professional lines are a waste of his time, I guess he is probably right. Damnit.

I miss the good 'ol days pretty badly. Maybe I should act more like the modern American dealer and zip the trees out quicker, charge more, pay less, and steal from the 401K plan all the while entering false profits on my books then sell the business and buy some real estate in Aspen.
 
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<Rich Hoffman>
posted
Reply to post by Bob Underwood, on February 02, 2002 at 08:14:38:

I bought my 020T back in '94, before the EPA got a hold of it.I paid $650 for mine.At the time I didn't care,I wanted the best. The only problem I have had is the carb.The high-rpm started to get erratic.Rebuilding didn't help. I had to buy a new carb, $70. Now Ionly run mine on weekends but it has been a good saw. Rich.
 
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