Tree Tech Consulting    The Knothole  Hop To Forum Categories  Climbers' Corner    master saddle

Closed Topic Closed
Go
New
Find
Notify
Tools
master saddle
 Login/Join 
<Brian Kwiatkowski>
posted
Question: Has anyone gone from the old buckingham master to the new one? I like the master, but always thought it could use improvement.Comments?
 
Report This Post
<JPS>
posted
Reply to post by Brian Kwiatkowski, on December 05, 2000 at 00:14:59:

I have the new "master", I went from an old weaver.

What i dont like about the "master" (mostly i do like it) is that the belt is sewn to the pad and yuo cannot add any accessory clips, straps or whatnot. And the sewn loops in the front are a liitle small,l gotta force the "biners through.

Shelter is selling a french stepin saddle called "butterfly" that I like
 
Report This Post
<Brian K>
posted
Reply to post by JPS, on December 05, 2000 at 00:14:59:

Hey, JPS- thnx for info. Let me ask you this: Until recently, I was using split-tail,perfect for the master, esp. for re-directs, just unclip-redirect-clip in. Now I've gone with the machard tresse and unclipping the knot is impossible, one must totally untie to re-direct around an object. Are you familier enough w/ the M2 to know if it's any different? Also, do you feel the new leg suppoert system is better in the crotch - ie. do you have any complaints?
 
Report This Post
<MICHAEL STARNER>
posted
Reply to post by Brian K, on December 05, 2000 at 10:45:42:

I have a question. A split tail has it's own means of attatchment ( not a bridge) and so do the french prussiks ( usually a carabiner). Unless you're untieing your split tail wouldn't both get ups pose the same problems when redirecting? Also, one thing I don't like about the french prussiks is that the knots take up so much space on your rope.
 
Report This Post
<Brian K>
posted
Reply to post by MICHAEL STARNER, on December 05, 2000 at 19:03:46:

The trad. split-tail ie. 28"+/- spliced eye 1\2" line, is easy to redirect by simply opening biner (not acually untieing it) however when using the MT one would have to "milk" the entire setup (both ends of cord and pulley)around the biner to then extract the biner off of the saddle attachment point. On a master, that is impos. due to the tight tolerances in the attachment point stitching. (I know that may be hard to picture)
To address the size of the MT: I would have to say the overall "girth" of the trad. split-tail is bulky comp. to the MT. The MT may take up more length of rope, but the superior handling is well worth any trade-off. My opinion. Comments? Anyone know where to get a LOCKING ss small clevis? That would solve my master problem, I was just curious if the M2 was different.
 
Report This Post
<Tom Dunlap>
posted
Reply to post by Brian K, on December 06, 2000 at 17:15:12:

I am confused about why you cannot just unclip the biner with the MT/VT to redirect. Also, when I redi, I generally use the end of the rope, not the friction hitch.

Go to a marine supply store to find ss clevis. They are small and super strong. Find the screw in ones, not the twist lock. All you need to do is tighten them finger tight...and a little more with a pliers. Not too much though or you will distort the threads The marine selection is nice because you can find a number of configurations. Some with twists too.

Tom
 
Report This Post
<Brian K>
posted
Reply to post by Tom Dunlap, on December 06, 2000 at 22:23:30:

Imagine you've just pruned the top and south side of a large excurrent tree (mature Amer. Elm),your rope is threaded through a few branches and is not in-line with friction saver/tie-in point, to limb walk on the north side you must redirect both ends of your rope, the end terminated on your belt, and also the friction side, if you did only one, only one side of your rope would be clear to your tie-in point, the other would still be laced through the branches. If you look at the master saddle, the clip-in points are sewn webbing that allows a biner through, but is restricted enough that the locking gate will not pass through, the petzel fixed sheave pully employed w/ the MT is also small enough that the locking gate will not pass through on a standard dbl lock HMS biner. I'll check out marine supply, don't know why I didn't think of it! thnx
 
Report This Post
<Scott Cullen>
posted
Reply to post by Brian K, on December 07, 2000 at 08:06:03:

Hi guys. It's been a lot of years since I climbed and all the innovations you're discussing are new to me. But getting back to basics I think I understand the problem described to be your climbing line is on the wrong side of a lot branches or leaders and you can't swing to the other side of the tree. Been there. Forgetting about all the hardware options, you want an unobstructed swing between your tie in point and where you want to go. And in a really big tree it's a long hike to go back to the top and come down the other side. And if there are lots of limbs pulling your line down to you and throwing back up to a new tie in point can be tedious.

A simple solution is to bring an extra climbing line on the job and rig both in the tree top, one on each side. When you're done with one side the extra line is waiting for you on the other. I've even seen it done with three lines.
 
Report This Post
<Bob Underwood>
posted
Reply to post by Scott Cullen, on December 07, 2000 at 20:36:57:

When I was an arborist for Western Illinois University, I met a student who had worked for American on Long Island. He used about a 30 or 40' rope with a hook tied to each end and a prussic split tail system. Worked like an extra long safety lanyard. He had to retie often, but he never had much rope to pull and he was always fairly close to vertical from his tie-in point. I believe he used a single line to get into the tree and then this system to work it from the top down in pruning. I have always meant to try this out, but never have. Maybe this is the catalyst I need to try.

I have often used this to enter trees that were a little too far between branches to climb. Again short throws and short hauls, so I don't need as much skill at tossing or as much youth to pull up to the next branch.

Have fun, Bob
 
Report This Post
<JPS>
posted
Reply to post by Bob Underwood, on December 11, 2000 at 06:34:31:

My normal lanyard is 18ft on a grillon with a 'biner on each end.

I keep it disy-chained behind the grillon in easy trees.

In some trees I'll take out the 18ft and put in a 30-40ft hank.

For the real long piece, Mike Wendt showed me a better way to gather it. Wind hank up and use a large rubber band to hold togather and you can feed loops in and out as needed.
 
Report This Post
<fred>
posted
Reply to post by JPS, on December 12, 2000 at 09:05:26:

Back to the the redirect problem: I've got the master 2 with hms double locks: try again; you can squeeze the gate down through the webbed attachment points if you really try.
 
Report This Post
  Powered by Social Strata  

Closed Topic Closed

Tree Tech Consulting    The Knothole  Hop To Forum Categories  Climbers' Corner    master saddle

© 1997-2003 Tree Tech Consulting. All messages are the property of the original author.