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<Tom Dunlap>
posted
Tim Walsh sent me a link this morning that shows the value of the ISA.

The Journal of Arboriculture is a publication "...devoted to the dissemination of
knowledge in the sicince and art of growing and maintaining amenity trees." For years,
the titles of the articles could be searched on line. NOW!!! the ISA has the first issue
completely accessible on the web:
http://joa.isa-arbor.com/

The ISA is considering putting on all of the past JoA for access. This would make a lot
of sense. Since, unfortunately, most issues of the JoA aren't read, it would save a lot of
money and pulpwood if they only existed in electronic format.

Keep up the good work ISA!

Tom
 
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<James Causton>
posted
Reply to post by Tom Dunlap, on January 14, 2002 at 14:19:14:

I can't agree with you more Tom in respect of this issue of sharing and spreading information. However, I must express some doubt about it's effectiveness. It will only reach those people commited to using their computers to access information. I suspect many people have them yet do not use them to the max.
As an aside in this respect, I remember an incident, a number of years ago, when computer use was being touted as an end to "unnecessary paper waste, I sent a client a report on a 3.5" floppy, it was not well received. It did not seem to matter that all the same info was there, as would have been in hard copy, nor did it seem to matter that it was already there available in their computer, to get filed as necessary, they felt "ripped off" because they did not receive "hard copy" in the mail!!!
We have a long way to go yet!!!!

James.
 
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<JPS>
posted
Reply to post by Tom Dunlap, on January 14, 2002 at 14:19:14:

I agree Tom, I more then often read only the abstracts and flie them away. Aint nobody around to see the binders of JoA on my bookshelf! Hmmm now the back issues were availible on CD????
 
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<Scott Cullen>
posted
Reply to post by Tom Dunlap, on January 14, 2002 at 14:19:14:

It would be interesting to know what the cost equation is.... printed journal vs on-line journal. I'd guess that most ISA members join for a bunch of reasons other than getting the journal. If the journal is freely available on-line will it cut dues revenue? Even if it does does cost reduction offset it?

Assuming operating costs are met, the bigger more important issue is that the science gets in more hands more easily. JoA is a reasonably obscure journal. Architects, planners, landscape architects, engineers, lawyers, politicians, etc. are not likely to know it even exists. They are likely at one time or another to do a web search on a topic and now they have a chance of not just identifying but immediately downloading good information.

The for profit journal world has jumped all over this on-line thing. I recently had to get an engineering journal article in a hurry. I downloaded it after a credit card payment of $25, and then read in the download that they sell hard copy reprints for $0.10/page + postage. This was not a 250 page article!

I think treating these resources as a profit center is the wrong idea, given ISA's mission. The idea is to get the knowledge out. And the authors probably feel the same way... they don't share in incremental revenue on distributing the articles.
 
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<JPS>
posted
Reply to post by Scott Cullen, on January 14, 2002 at 14:19:14:

Is this in responce to my CD thought? If the abstracts are on line in a searchable database (That has pages that can be e-mailed or atleeast easily linked. I hate these sites that dont have an URL for the search result, you an only send the search page to a preson and say search theis. But I digress again.) Then all 300 plus issues can be stored on in a relatively small "space" vice the need for charts and photos and such.

Then having the full work availible on request for theos who need it for a modest sum, those of who want the past issues for out library can order them. If there is a preseived loss of value to the members we could go to an end of year mailing of a CD. Less expenxsive media, shipping costs cut drasticly.
 
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<Tom Dunlap>
posted
Reply to post by Scott Cullen, on January 14, 2002 at 14:19:14:

Scott,

I sure can't speak for the ISA, but let me share some ideas that have been tossed around by ISA folks.

They look at online as cheaper because of no printing and distribution costs. That is where money will be "made" right off the bat. They will have to struggle with either opening up the information to everyone for free or on a pay to own basis.

There is the potential for a lot of good information within keyboard access. I talked with Bob Miller last week and he said that the goal now is to get the past five years up on the web.

Tom
 
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<Scott>
posted
Reply to post by Tom Dunlap, on January 26, 2002 at 07:27:46:

I'll have to write Bob and Peggy a note. The formatting style of URLs in bibliographies is a fairly new convention for ISA. Right now the only hard rule they've established is no underline. But that means no hyperlink. Given the commitment to on-line publishing, that omits another fabulous resource.... immediate hyperlink to any cited reference with an active URL.

Do you know if hyperlinks are active only in .html or can also be active in .pdf?
 
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<Bob Underwood>
posted
Reply to post by Scott, on February 02, 2002 at 00:21:14:

Scott,

They are active in both as long as you load in in a browser program.

Bob
 
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<Jerry Bond>
posted
Reply to post by Scott, on February 02, 2002 at 00:21:14:

Scott, you can create a hyperlink in a document and then remove the underlining without removing the hyperlink. In Word, for instance, you just highlight the link, right-click, select font, then select "none" under underlining.
About hyperlinks, here is the official word: "Any Weblinks on the pages are still active in PDFÂjust click a link to
download the linkÂs pages, and add them to the end of the document.
Depending on the options you select when downloading Web pages, an Adobe PDF
document created from Web pages can display special tagged bookmarks that retain Web
information, such as the URLs for all links on the pages.You can use these tagged
bookmarks to navigate, to reorganize or delete pages, and to download more pages.You
can also add more tagged bookmarks to represent paragraphs, images, table cells, and
other items on the pages." (Adobe Help)
 
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<Scott>
posted
Reply to post by Jerry Bond, on February 02, 2002 at 07:20:42:

Thanks Jerry. I just updated to Acrobat 5.0 and somehow the installation got corrupted becuase it wo'nt read most documents.... some sort of "plug-in initialization error." So I'll have to get this sorted out before I can experiment.
 
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<Nickrosis>
posted
Reply to post by James Causton, on January 14, 2002 at 14:19:14:

I understand where you are all coming from, but I am concerned about the potential for eroding the funding that keeps the Journal in existence. I, for one, would not be happy with a site for the Journal chock full of pop-up advertising just to replace the loss of paper subscriptions. Somehow, the transition would have to be done so that the research can continue to be funded while the information is spread to a wider and wider audience.

If you don't read the entire Journal, please at least read the abstracts. Many industries are plagued by ignorance, but the tree industry is riding a wave of education. Please further that in your own life.

At any rate, I have a lot of questions for that shorter fellow across the hall with a white beard. I asked Dr. Miller a lot of questions today about finding an American beech (Fagus grandifolia) in Wisconsin. Found a 2", 4' tree for $278. Not even delivered.

I like this board, too. [Smile]

Nickrosis
 
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<guest>
posted
Reply to post by Tom Dunlap, on January 14, 2002 at 14:19:14:

be spicific on your bord to your mom/dad.
 
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