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<Nicole Kansara>
posted
I read that plants grow faster if some kind of music is played in their vicinity. What type of music is goof for the plants?
 
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<Guy>
posted
Reply to post by Nicole Kansara, on August 16, 2002 at 10:17:12:

Experiments with vegetables--broccoli etc.-- showed melodic music such as baroque or classical resulted in better growth than discordant music
 
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<Zvonka>
posted
Reply to post by guy, on August 16, 2002 at 10:17:12:

Fishily...

What kind of tests did they make?
 
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<brian>
posted
Reply to post by Nicole Kansara, on August 16, 2002 at 10:17:12:

Bach - the name means "brook" - is good for reeds, papyrus and water-lilies. Handel's Water Music may also help.

The music of Rameau - "branch" - should be played to keep trees happy.

Beethoven's Sixth Symphony - "The Pastoral" - is excellent for wheat-fields, which have fine ears, although it would be tactful to omit the harvest movement.
 
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<Zvonka>
posted
Reply to post by brian, on August 16, 2002 at 10:17:12:

Also the music of Russian composer Glinka is good, because it fertilises soils.
(One of the most famouse manual of soil science in Russia was written by another Glinka [Smile]
 
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<brian>
posted
Reply to post by Zvonka, on August 17, 2002 at 02:23:18:

And don't forget that English country gardens thrive on Percy Grainger, while pines (especially in Rome) love listening to Respighi.
 
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<Reed>
posted
Reply to post by Nicole Kansara, on August 16, 2002 at 10:17:12:

It's not just music, as we define it. It could fall within some convention of physics but those understandings are limited as well. I like to use the term 'energies'.

Mathematics are a sense of rhythmn, not as applications (that's like control of electricity as opposed to understanding), but as melody, or flow. Bach could calculate without reason the continuity of flow, his expressions were defined as complicated composures but were instead a parallel of water as it succumbs to gravity, movement around and over obstructions. The simplist and least resisted path. Like the spectrum of light that travels by mechanical means (protons) outward from it's source, all matter is movement and defined by it's mass which reacts to obstruction. Light is not itself energy, but the physical force that manufactured it, represents it. Sounds composed in sequential order, like light, stimulate.

Heck, what do I know? I took part in the photon research at Stanford funded by NASA in '77.....many new ways of thinking resulted from the work, old theories were destroyed and new questions came about. Plants were the basis of the work and it went far beyond the old "Glen Campbell" approach to pot farming.

One little hobby of mine at the time was thought process within the greenhouse, going both ways instead of arrogantly believing that humans could dictate pattern response in plants, we could actually learn a few things from them as well.

Sorry for the space trip, but you asked!
 
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<James Causton>
posted
Reply to post by Nicole Kansara, on August 16, 2002 at 10:17:12:

Hi Nicole, If you want to read some in depth literature regarding plant reactions to noise, both soothing and harsh, there are two books I would recommend. " The Secret Life of Plants" and "Secrets of The Soil" both authored by Peter Tompkins and Christopher Bird. In one instance Secret life of plants documents the ability to control movement of an electric train set, by way of sensors adjacent to the plants. There is a massive amount of research those folks undertook into plant reaction to sound. Fascinating reading too,

James
 
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<brian>
posted
Reply to post by Nicole Kansara, on August 16, 2002 at 10:17:12:

A fascinating paper was presented by Professor Gemüsetanz recently to the Viennese Society for Botanical Research entitled "Die Romantische Spargelspitzereaktion" (The response of asparagus tips to romantic music). As you probably know, there is a well-documented phenomenon of asparagus shoots "dancing" to Strauss waltzes. It is a persistent response that can continue even after the plant's apparent death. Indeed, at Vienna's Hotel Sacher there were so many complaints that they removed the vegetable from the menu. Research work in Professor Gemüsetanz's department has now been extended to the response of potatoes to the works of Mahler, in particular Das Lied von der Erde.
 
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