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<lann>
posted
I have planted Lombardy Poplar saplings as a border on my property. Some are within 5 feet of my septic leech field. My neighbor tells me that the roots will destroy my septic system. Someone please give me advice. Should I transplant the trees or will they be okay?

Also, I have planted a Flowering Cherry at the corner of my house. It is by the downspout from my gutters. The leaves are turning yellow and drooping. Is the tree getting too much water? I am in NJ, and have just recently come out of a 20-30 day drought but have had 4-5 days of periodic rain.
 
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<Steve Morse>
posted
Reply to post by lann, on June 09, 2001 at 08:17:59:

All poplars are very poor trees to have around septic drainfields. One recommendation is trees in general not be planted any close to a drainage then the tree will grow to a maturity.
All recommendation specifically list poplars and willows as having very invasive roots. Move the poplars.
 
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<Paul H>
posted
Reply to post by Steve Morse, on June 09, 2001 at 08:17:59:

Myths, Steve

If the drainage system is sound or after repair, roots (of ANY tree) have little capacity to access/damage underground services.

Paul H.
 
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<Scott Cullen>
posted
Reply to post by Paul H, on June 12, 2001 at 17:23:05:

Sanitary or storm drains that are intended to carry waste or water from point A to point B should indeed be "tight" and relatively impervious to root infiltration.

The terminal portions of septic systems (points C), however, are by design "open" and intended to deliver effluent to a leaching field where the liquid is dispersed into surrounding soil, typically in the upper 18-24" of soil where micro-organisms are active and coincidentally roots are also most concentrated.

Similarly, foundation or footing drains are often by design "open" and intended to act as collectors of ground water which is subsequently delivered by closed pipe to point B.
 
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<Mark Goodwin>
posted
Reply to post by Scott Cullen, on June 24, 2001 at 17:08:07:

...and then there are the tight lines which have been opened by someone knocking a hole in them to serve as an expedient cleanout. They fill with roots in no time at all.
 
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<JPS>
posted
Reply to post by Scott Cullen, on June 24, 2001 at 17:08:07:

I guess it depends on the type of system, mound would be bad to have trees by. But I've knoen people h\who put willowa at the bottom of large leaching feilds to help finish the job.

On a similar note; I heard a story once about a guy who dropped a willow some 5 ft across at the but. He came back the next day to finnish cleanup to find that it had grown over a small spring that was now welling up. (was now, is that oxymoronic?)
 
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<Peter Torres>
posted
Reply to post by lann, on June 09, 2001 at 08:17:59:

While you are pondering your poplar placement,
look up (Cryptodiaporte populea).
 
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