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<Dan>
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If I suspect canker-rot fungi based on clinical signs and symptoms would that be enough to justify removal even though the tree or tree part is structurally sound based on the 6:1 ratio which is what I am comfortable using? Do I want to see spores, even in the dried states, for ID or should I just assume aggressive behavior in the absence of callus/woundwood which would indicate annual or perennial types? Should I assume most decay is likely to be cankerous or wood decay fungi whether its origin is biotic or abiotic in nature? If the clients goals are to preserve the tree should I be exercising invasive procedures for possitive ID of an aggressive pathogen? If so, what field analyses are practical for this ID? Is the damage from an invasive diagnosis justified or have I just exasperated the situation? I wouldn't want to charge for a crown cleaning etc. if I suspect the tree may be a removal in 1,3,5 years - would I? What if I find this decay at 30' in the stem or close to the stem - do I assume it is an aggressive pathogen and switch gears mid contract to recommend removal because the whole tree is doomed? Or do I do the work and leave my card for the next 'guaranteed' job? (ethics?) I currently take two saws up when I suspect this situation (I'm sure not often enough) but is anyone disinfecting their saws between cuts, in the bucket, off the rope, how are they doing it logistically?

Is anyone using microscopes for 'at the shop' analyses? If so - what kind? I'm new to the certification world but I am trying so I would appreciate some advice or hear some opinions.

Side note - Mr. Stephen Wiley, where did you go? I have a 'death by chainsaw' thread going in the Trees and Law forum but have not heard back from you since you were interrupted.

Thanks - DanInonotus, Phellinus pini
 
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