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2000 Montezuma cypresses 5km along river, dying
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<Pierre T Marchebout Urrea>
posted
Hi i am in Jalisco Mexico. We have a riparian area of 5km long (2.8 miles long), where there are about 2000 old montezuma cypresses. The average age of these trees should be around 90 years. Some of the trees started to show signs of deppresed vigor about 5 years ago, and since than, many have died. It is a pitty, since this tree is our national tree, and mutost of them are beautiful. We do not know yet what fungi is affecting them, but it advances slowly and it is persistingly. We also have secondary drilling insects, such as mops and beetles, that are attacking the trees. In some areas the tree bark appears consistently drilled by these all the wat from the bottom to the top.


We have start an integrated treatment of the area, with tree injection, using imiciclorapid, and combined with a sistemic fungicide. Has any one ever treated old trees in river areas with several simultaneous problems?.

We will also prune old susceptible branches. Thanks
 
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<Reed>
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Reply to post by Pierre T Marchebout Urrea, on October 25, 2002 at 17:40:24:

Pierre,
what is the rationale for the injections - i.e., what disease has been identified specifically?
 
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<Mark Goodwin>
posted
Reply to post by Pierre T Marchebout Urrea, on October 25, 2002 at 17:40:24:

I only know from reading, and few pests are noted for this species. Bark borers and moths are mentioned. Where I live, Ponderosa pine is susceptible to many pests and diseases, including borers. perhaps something may be learned from the one and applied to the other. The pest populations in Ponderosa can boom under certain conditions, such as: cutting and leaving slash for the borers to breed in, drought stress, excessive competition, loss of predatory populations that help control borers. Additionally, certain borers introduce fungal disease which can kill the host tree.
It is important to identify the pests and pathogens. Also, a study of the local environment may identify changes or stress factors. It may be that the forest is thinning itself through the effects of competition. Or there could be other factors.
I would like to hear more about things as they develop.
 
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<Pierre T Marchebout Urrea>
posted
Reply to post by Reed, on October 25, 2002 at 17:40:24:

The rationale is the persistance and efectiveness of imidacloprid with dendroctonus ans ips beetles. Additionally, because this is a valued riparian area an incsecticide with little environmental impact is required, and injection appears to be the most efficient method to avoid spills.
 
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<Pierre Marchebout>
posted
Thanks for your comments mark. Until now, the treatment of the trees with imidacloprid has helped. However, the other detrimental factors you mentioned are also presente in the area, since water availability changes constantly, the mountains that soround these old trees have been severely deforested, and there is a community that allows cattle around the area where these trees are. We will try everything to help them to survive, but it is going to take a substantial effort. Thanks again.
quote:
Originally posted by Mark Goodwin:
_Reply to post by _Pierre T Marchebout Urrea_, on October 25, 2002 at 17:40:24:_<br /><br />I only know from reading, and few pests are noted for this species. Bark borers and moths are mentioned. Where I live, Ponderosa pine is susceptible to many pests and diseases, including borers. perhaps something may be learned from the one and applied to the other. The pest populations in Ponderosa can boom under certain conditions, such as: cutting and leaving slash for the borers to breed in, drought stress, excessive competition, loss of predatory populations that help control borers. Additionally, certain borers introduce fungal disease which can kill the host tree. <br />It is important to identify the pests and pathogens. Also, a study of the local environment may identify changes or stress factors. It may be that the forest is thinning itself through the effects of competition. Or there could be other factors.<br />I would like to hear more about things as they develop.
 
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