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Washington Hawthorne insects & disease
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<Carol>
posted
I have 2 Washington Hawthorne trees I was going to plant along my back fence. A friend who works for a lawn care company told me to get rid of them instead. He said they can be carriers of insects that look like bag worms (I forget the name) that move to nearby junipers and that they tend to be 'buggy' in general. He also said the berries go moldy. In short they are not a good yard tree.
I hate to destroy them but with that kind of news, I wouldn't want to give them away. How concerned should I be about these liabilities?
 
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<Mark Goodwin>
posted
Reply to post by Carol, on September 03, 2002 at 20:12:47:

It may be that your friend has a bias based upon his own experience. On the other hand, he may be passing on poor advice.
Often, plants encounter problems with insect and disease in one area, but not in another. I did a search for problems with this selection and came up with nothing that looks like a serious and consistent problem.
The tree is highly valued for feeding wildlife. It is grown in a wide number of places in the country. I even saw it as a substitution plant on a list of problem plants in Colorado. You would do well to ask around your local area to get other informed opinions, before deciding to get rid of your trees.
 
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<Russ Carlson>
posted
Reply to post by Carol, on September 03, 2002 at 20:12:47:

I agree with Mark. The Washington Hawthorn is a nice tree in most places. Like most trees, it does get some insect and disease problems, but usually none that are all that serious. They do flower nicely, and the berries can be attractive.

The trees should be planted where they have some room to grow, without interferring with walkways, patios and other busy areas. Make sure they are properly planted. Remove any twine and burlap, and dig around the base with a trowel until you find the tops of the first large roots. This should be the final soil level. Then mulch, Mulch, MULCH!! (3 inches deep, and NOT against the bark of the trunk.)

Good luck. Enjoy your new trees!
 
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<Lewis Johnson>
posted
Reply to post by Carol, on September 03, 2002 at 20:12:47:

I have a Washington Hawthorne from the Arbor day foundation. I planted it about five years ago as a 3 foot twig and now it is over 15 feet tall and big and healthy as ever. Never had any problems with bugs or diseases at all. Birds love it. Just be careful of the thorns when pruning.
Location: Southwest Ohio.
 
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<Phil>
posted
Reply to post by Lewis Johnson, on September 03, 2002 at 20:12:47:

We recently bought an older home & moved in last April. I did nothing to two 25' trees that looked like they were struggling and had orange powder all over them in the Spring. No one could identify the trees, but I believe they are Wash. Hawthorns and they do not have any berries now and appear to be dead. The photos I saw on-line were great, but I wonder if there is a fungus among us (at least in NC). Both trees are dead and were about 45' from ea. other. None of my other trees, shrubs, flowers, etc. had any problems.

I went to local plant stores etc., but no one could identify the leaf, let alone the orange powder. Any thoughts in e-land?
 
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<S K Akins>
posted
Reply to post by Mark Goodwin, on September 03, 2002 at 20:12:47:

Of all the different species of Crataegus that are available, I am most impressed by the "Washington hawthorne". In northeastern Texas where I once lived, the little Washington hawthorne street tree in my yard was beautiful, tough, and trouble free. I now live in the Bluegrass region of Kentucky which was recently hit by a severe ice storm; many river birches, Bradford pears, etc. were totally decimated. The hawthorne was barely affected. I intend to recommend this tree to friends and neighbors as a replacement tree for their damaged ones!
 
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<K Ann>
posted
We planted three Washington Hawthorne trees 12 years ago and had very good luck until last summer, when I noticed an orange powdery substance on many of the leaves. I was assured that it would not damage the trees and was weather related (we had a very wet cool spring). This year one of the trees looks dead and the other two look sick. Many branches are without leaves and have black gall-like growths near the tips. Could this be Black Knot disease? Should we remove all three?
 
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