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HP 1120C Deskjet Printer & A General Printer Query
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<Scott Cullen>
posted
1) Just bought an HP 1120C Deskjet printer. It's been on my wishlist for a while and the laser printer is down for service so it gave me an excuse. All the standard features of color inkjet printers with a couple of key additions. It will print on media up to 13 x 19, that includes standard 11x17 "ledger" paper. Very useful for plot plans, maps, diagrams and large spreadsheets. It will also do fancy stuff like break an image up into many segments so you can print each segment on a sheet of standard paper and piece them back together as a large poster, but I've not experimented yet.

The other news that list price is $499, but there is an HP $100 rebate in effect until 11/25/99. Just be sure you ask about it or go to HP's website... the dealers may forget to tell you.

2) A query. Printed out an 80 page file and realized that - as contrasted to my laser printer - the inkjet stacks the printed output so you wind up with the first page at the bottom of the stack. 80 pages is a bother to have to restack in proper order. Once the laser is repaired I guess I'll use it as the priamry document printer and save the inkjet for color insertions, maps, etc.

Wondered how others handle this characteristic. Do you just plan on resorting the pages? Stand there and flip thme as they come out? Are there after market resorting or flipping devices?
 
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<JPS>
posted
Reply to post by Scott Cullen, on October 31, 1999 at 12:44:34:

small ones I pull out as the go, big stacks i put off.

BTW, they make their real money with the ink cartridges, was doing every thing in grayscale I didnt absolutly need color tilthe company my sis works for upgraded from ahp 693c. Now I have a case they would have trown awya!
 
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<Russ Carlson>
posted
Reply to post by Scott Cullen, on October 31, 1999 at 12:44:34:

Some of the word processing software allows printing back to front- Word Perfect does. There is a selection checkbox in the Print dialog. Look for that or perhaps in your page setup options. There may also be third-party utilities to do this, but I don't know of any specifically.
 
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<Scott>
posted
Reply to post by jps, on October 31, 1999 at 12:44:34:

10-4. That's how Gillette and Schick made their fortunes... give away the razor handle and they'll be buying double edge blades forever!
 
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<Scott>
posted
Reply to post by Russ Carlson, on October 31, 1999 at 12:44:34:

Thanks Russ, was focusing on hardware and neglected to even consider a software solution. Never paid attention to what the "back to front" option was for!
 
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<JPS>
posted
Reply to post by Scott, on October 31, 1999 at 20:11:59:

Roger that 10-4!

every time I look at replacemets for my electric i crige and thank the Good Lord for giving me a baby face!

Tho at 34 i'm starting to have to she three times a week now!
 
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<Russ Carlson>
posted
Reply to post by Scott Cullen, on October 31, 1999 at 12:44:34:

Epson announced a new printer this week with much the same specs- large format and color, etc, for less than $500.
 
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<Scott>
posted
Reply to post by Russ Carlson, on October 31, 1999 at 12:44:34:

When I bought the HP the salesman at CompUSA said the HP did something better than the Epson, and that happened to fit my needs somehow... but I can't recall exactly what it was! It might have been that the HP jetting scheme produced better resolution on plain paper while the Epson really wanted glossy paper for best color rendition. Also list on that Epson was slighlty higher than the HP and HP had a $100 rebate as well.

I had very good performance and service from the two Epson printers I owned and HP is highly regarded as well. I think the things to consider - as always - are various features and performance relative to your needs, price, and dealer/service facilities convenient to you.

Another thing is cost of use. The inkjets have three different ink systems: 1) on the low end has one cartridge of three primary colors and they all get mixed to emulate black... so if you print mostly B&W you burn up color inks to do it. 2) a separate resevoir for black and for the three primaries. You save on color when printing only B&W. But when one of the primaries runs out you replace even if there's a lot of the other primaries left. 3) 4 separate cartridges... 1 each for black and the three primaries. At something like $35 a pop for the cartirdges waste adds up quickly. Paper costs can add up quickly too at $.50 a page for photo quality.
 
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<Russ Carlson>
posted
Reply to post by Russ Carlson, on October 31, 1999 at 12:44:34:

Checked again-
It's the Epson Stylus 1400. Prints to 1400 dpi, 4 picoliter dots (miserly on ink, great on resolution?). Prints pages to 13 x 44 inches- yes, 44 inches it said. List price: $449

I'm starting to get site plans for development in color! It makes reading the plans much easier.
 
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<Scot>
posted
Reply to post by Russ Carlson, on November 05, 1999 at 23:37:28:

The HP 1120C is only 600x600 DPI with 10 picoliter drops (but that's supposedly 70% smaller than earlier models?). With some whiz bang proprietary technology that allows placing up to 16 drops per dot and multiple colors and shades per dot. Don't have a clue what that means... but I'd guess that with much smaller dots you need more DPI to fill the white space and that's what Epson did. Maybe that's why the salesman told me the Epson was the better glossy paper color photo printer.

HP 1120C prints to 13x19 cut sheets. My guess is 13x44 might be a roll fed type of option. The HP says it will print "banners" to long lengths, but only with special HP 8.5x11 banner paper that looks like fanfold, perforated stuff we used to use in dot matrix printers. Since they both handle the 13 width, the lenght issue may be a software and memory issue.
 
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<Russ Carlson>
posted
Reply to post by Scot, on November 07, 1999 at 00:55:03:

Just offering some info, not trying to sell you on it

No matter what decision I make, I always end up second guessing it when I see the next catalog with lower prices/newer models.... :/
 
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<Scott>
posted
Reply to post by Russ Carlson, on November 07, 1999 at 13:49:26:

I didn't think you were pitching... too late any way I already bought the HP. I think the point is you really have to look at these machines closely to see the differences in performance and even closer to understand what the proclaimed differences mean. Then look at the catalogues and see what you can do on price. Then make a decision... and next week somethine slicker and cheaper will come out.
 
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<Wulkie>
posted
Reply to post by jps, on November 01, 1999 at 07:33:08:


There are very good third-party refill companies for both HP and Epson that ease the financial burden of printing a lot of pages. Also, with a bit of research you will find reams and reams of glossy or clay coated paper that do just as well as the little packages of ink jet paper. You can save a bundle by looking into this.

I bought one of the first Epsons (I have a habit of leading with my wallet) and wrote to them that giving a sheet a double pass printing gave spectacular color--I had today's quality pictures 6 or 7 years' ago. I tightened up the paper registration a bit, but even at factory specs it was (is?) still a good technique.

Be careful of the position of the print on the page--where the gripping is done. My 1520 had very awkward placement and it was a pain in the ass when trying to do composite big images.

If you have an Epson, inquire about the Adobe RIP software; I don't know if mine fits the new machines. Tru-type has always been a graphics catastrophe, the fonts are insipid compared to the professional fonts in Adobe. Whenever I can, I try to use the Adobe fonts, the printed pages are unarguably more handsome and that makes a real difference to someone reading your work. The readers can't quite explain it, but they agree the page is more professional.


tubs
 
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<Helen - inkjet printer cartridge>
posted
Reply to post by Scott, on November 05, 1999 at 23:37:28:

Great Site! I really like your site content, it's usefull and informative. I am working for online store selling discount printer ink cartridge refill. I find your site while searching for related sites and It's a pleasure to sign your guestbook. Thanks and Good Luck.
 
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