Tree Tech Consulting    The Knothole  Hop To Forum Categories  Tools & Techniques    Tree cavity

Closed Topic Closed
Go
New
Find
Notify
Tools
Tree cavity
 Login/Join 
<Clair Rankin>
posted
Hi. I'm in Cape Breton, Nova Scotia where tree professionals are few and far between. Most folks say-cut it down but I thought I'd post this and see what anyone might suggest.
The tree is an apple tree, 40 + years, thirty feet high, hasn't been pruned in ten years, and was pruned badly then. Consquently, the tree has a hollow core reaching up to ten feet off the ground with space at the base of the tree measuring 1 1/2 feet across. I chipped all the dead wood out of the core but what do I do now to protect whats left?
Do I fill it up with concrete reinforced with rebar?
Do I seal the inside of the tree with something to keep the bugs and water out?
Do I let it live out its life and let it crack off?
It still bears plenty of fruit. Thanks for any and all replies.
Clair.
 
Report This Post
<Guy>
posted
Reply to post by Clair Rankin, on October 17, 2002 at 08:16:33:

A defect at the base can be managed in part by reducing the crown. Apple trees will tolerate some cuts to reduce the height, thus reducing the strain on the cavity.

Removing SOFT material is a good idea, but chipping away dead wood that still provides support is not something I would do. Filling the cavity can make the tree less likely to twist and break, but it is a difficult process. You can do more harm than good.

Best to fertilize (yes, in fall AND spring) and mulch the entire root system. The more roots function the more the tree can seal off decay.
 
Report This Post
<Mark Goodwin>
posted
Reply to post by Clair Rankin, on October 17, 2002 at 08:16:33:

You might consider in-arching, a type of grafting procedure that uses rooted cuttings or seedlings planted nearby to bolster the tree. It may be more useful in adding functioning root system to the plant, rather than adding much strength to the weakened trunk. Reduction of heavy and unbalanced canopy would also be needed.
You might also consider other supports, especially during the load of fruit. Apple orchardists often put poles beneath branches to support the weight of fruit.
 
Report This Post
  Powered by Social Strata  

Closed Topic Closed

Tree Tech Consulting    The Knothole  Hop To Forum Categories  Tools & Techniques    Tree cavity

© 1997-2003 Tree Tech Consulting. All messages are the property of the original author.