Tree Tech Consulting    The Knothole  Hop To Forum Categories  ASCA Discussion Group Archives    Nusery Stock Recomendations

Read-Only Read-Only Topic
Go
New
Find
Notify
Tools
Nusery Stock Recomendations
 Login/Join
 
<Dan Nelson>
posted
I am interested in growing ornamental trees to sell to the public on 40 acres in southern Delaware. I am some what familiar with the pot in pot method.

I am seeking advice as to which cultivars I should grow. Trees which could be propated by cuttings would be disirable. I am not into grafting but am willing to learn if that is the way I should go.

Our company consist of two certified arborist as owners and 5 tree workers in the field. We are often asked to plant trees but nursery stock is of poor quality in our area. We could sell a lot of trees. We would want to sell our trees at maybe 2 inch diameter max. Trees our tree crew could plant by hand while doing tree work at the job site would be preferrable.

Please help me to make the right cultivar choices for my nursery stock purchases. Sources would be apreciated also. Of course, souces for educational materials on this subject are a first priority.

Thank You,

Dan Nelson
Sussex Tree Inc.
R.R. 3 Box 114
Bridgeville DE 19933
 
Report This Post
<Scott Cullen>
posted
Reply to post by Dan Nelson, on October 13, 1999 at 13:32:02:

There was a fascinating field presentation by Dr. Chris Starbuck at the ISA conference in August. He demonstrated the Missouri Gravel Bed method. It's a variation on bare root and seems mostly to be a holding over method, but that holdover might be long enough to bring the stock you buy to that <2" market size you describe. Seems to have some real labor and production cost advantages vs. in ground, container or pot in pot. I think you might fine literaturte in a JofA search.
 
Report This Post
<lewbloch>
posted
Reply to post by Dan Nelson, on October 13, 1999 at 13:32:02:

Dan,
I suggest that you contact as many of the leading landscape architects in the MidAtlantic area as you can to determine what kind of trees they will be specifying. Also, contact the various universitys and extension agents to find out what trees are on their lists of acceptable trees. Good luck!
Very treely,
Lew
 
Report This Post
<Russ Carlson>
posted
Reply to post by Dan Nelson, on October 13, 1999 at 13:32:02:

Dan, be sure to contact Delaware Association of Nureserymen (DAN). Call Sue Barton at Cooperative Extension at the University in Newark for more information. It is the way to go. They can help you find all the information you'll need to get started and keep going. They have acertification program for nurserymen.
 
Report This Post
<Dan Nelson>
posted
Reply to post by Russ Carlson, on October 13, 1999 at 13:32:02:

Gee Whiz, you guys really are experts. You referred me to other sources, when in fact, I was seeking your input into cultivar selection.

The gravel bed growth system sounds interesting.

I belong to the Delaware Association of Nurserymen and attend their meetings.

I don't feel landscape artichokes are the best source of information about tree selection, or any other tree knowledge for that matter.

I know it's a hard question. Maybe the local Master Gardening Club can help me out :-(

I kind of was looking for suggestions about what trees in the future will be the best trees for the urban landscape. I plan on selling directly to the end user who's trust I have earned through years of tree care services. The largest selling cultivars are not always the best cultivars, as we learn years later.

Just trying to get ahead of the curve.

Dan
 
Report This Post
<Russ Carlson>
posted
Reply to post by Dan Nelson, on October 13, 1999 at 19:32:32:

Dan, if I was much good at predicting the best choice at the future, I'd spend my time day-trading or at the track... [Smile]

The problemis there are som many good (and just as many por) selections available it is hard to know where to start. Do you want to go for something unusual or exotic? Or something more ordinary but tested?

Among my favorites are the less common trees that have proven themselves. Leyland cypress are becoming popular, but they require special attention in handling. Small sizes in pots are probably best for these. Another favorite is the Metasequoia- a hardy tree, very strong, not difficult to propogate and nurse.

Then there are the maples- reds and sugars. Select among the cultivars for a variety of characteristics, particularly autumn color.

Crabapples, flowering cherries, and dogwoods are easy to sell.

I think the best way to figure it out is to talk to other growers to see what is selling and what they are planting. Then pick something else Also look to see what you clients have, and what they are planting, or simply ask them for their favorites. With the size of parcel you have, you won't plant a huge number of trees, but it should be enough to let you have a nice selection of species and cultivars.

Hope this helps more [Smile]
 
Report This Post
  Powered by Social Strata  

Read-Only Read-Only Topic

Tree Tech Consulting    The Knothole  Hop To Forum Categories  ASCA Discussion Group Archives    Nusery Stock Recomendations

© 1997-2003 Tree Tech Consulting. All messages are the property of the original author.