Read-Only Read-Only Topic
Go
New
Find
Notify
Tools
Hazard Tree
 Login/Join
 
<Kim>
posted
Hello,

I was wondering if I can get some feedback.
I was recently asked by the town manager of my community to ...'have a look at a large hemlock and let me know how it is'.
I told him sure I'll take a look. It turned out to be a very large Norway Spruce, 50 ft and 23" in caliper. It looks healthy.
I checked out the branch growth and it to put out an inch and a half last year, plus there are many new buds ready to be pushed out this season. It seemed to be just fine in the leaf & stem production area.
BUT...
upon closer examination, I noticed that the base of the tree had two wounds. One large, one small.
There was one fruiting body next to the larger wound growing on the ground.
I felt and probed the large wound and the exposed heartwood was mushy closest to the ground.

Now, the town manager asked me to look at the tree and let him know what I think, but what I I think is that it should be treated as a hazard tree assesment.
I thought I would send a brief letter to him stating some facts and that the tree needs further study.
Any other thoughts out there??

Kim [Smile]
 
Report This Post
<Wayne Cahilly>
posted
Reply to post by Kim , on March 07, 2000 at 15:26:39:

Hi Kim,

You have the right idea so far. The assignment was to look at the tree and tell the manager how it was in your opinion; after looking, you seem to be of the opinion that further investigation is necessary, thats an honest response. There are many resources available to use as guides in conducting a hazard assessment but if you have not done it before and the tree is in a key location or in an area with many "targets" you may want to get help with the evaluation.

It can be a pretty complex project to assess a norway spruce of that size simply because the amount of wind a tree of that dimension catches is huge and that needs to be considered. The wound you mention at ground level may be associated with decay in the rootsystem and that too should not be left unassessed.

I would agree that you should put your thoughts on paper to the super and give him some guidance what you think he should do. Its sounds like he has to make the decision but you can help him to understand the situation better.

Wayne
 
Report This Post
<Kim>
posted
Reply to post by Wayne Cahilly, on March 07, 2000 at 15:26:39:

Thanks Wayne,

The spruce is in a high traffic area, with many possible targets, and it is highly visible. I have written a rough draft explaining to the manager that, though I did casually look at the tree at his request, I suggested he persue a more in depth analysis of the tree. I briefly explained what a hazard tree evaluation is and told him that I would be happy to discuss it further. I also mentioned that the tree needs to be examined to better assess its structural soundness.

If he wants me to do the evaluation, I will be getting plenty of advice- I am fairly new to this.

Kim [Smile]
 
Report This Post
<Wayne Cahilly>
posted
Reply to post by Kim , on March 07, 2000 at 17:01:02:

Kim,

Hopefully the super will realize that the investment in a careful analysis will give him a greater chance of making a wise decision about the tree. Where are you located?

Wayne
 
Report This Post
<Kim Syrel>
posted
Reply to post by Wayne Cahilly, on March 08, 2000 at 21:24:54:

Wayne,
Sorry to be so tardy in responding- I am starting to get busy now that warmer weather is setting in.
I am in Connecticut.
Where are you?

Kim [Smile]
 
Report This Post
  Powered by Social Strata  

Read-Only Read-Only Topic


© 1997-2003 Tree Tech Consulting. All messages are the property of the original author.