Closed Topic Closed
Go
New
Find
Notify
Tools
The Bibles
 Login/Join 
<Robert Underwood>
posted
Mark,

As an instructor, I find the more I read the less I know, so I have to read more to learn even less for sure. As you can see this could become a viscious circle. Here are some of my favorites by subject.

Arboriculture - Harris
New Tree Biology - Shigo
Modern Arboriculture - Shigo (For quicker answers when dealin with general public)
Tree Climbers Companion - Jepson
Urban Soil in Landscape Design - Craul
Diseases of Trees and Shrubs - Sinclair

And for the real skinny on everything of importance: The Knothole - Carlson

These are what lay on the seat of my truck for the summer among the saws, pruners, potato chip bags and pop cans. It gives them that distressed look that makes the student think you actually use them in the fall.

Happy reading. Bob Underwood
 
Report This Post
<Bob Wulkowicz>
posted
Reply to post by Robert Underwood, on February 13, 1999 at 11:51:48:

Underwood,

Be careful about revealing your secrets where students may read them. But the picture of your slowly filling pickup cab with empty bags and cans does help explain the increasing amount of right-side fender damage as the school year draws closer.

Rotund Bob

P.S. Excellent list of books too.
 
Report This Post
<Russ Carlson>
posted
Reply to post by Robert Underwood, on February 13, 1999 at 11:51:48:

>>As an instructor, I find the more I read the less I know, so I have to read more to learn even less for sure. As you can see this could become a viscious circle.

I think you have defined an expert, Bob. An expert is expected to have read all the literature on a subject, ultimately knowing nothing about it at all.
 
Report This Post
<Paul Johnson>
posted
Reply to post by Robert Underwood, on February 13, 1999 at 11:51:48:

Thank you for sharing your list of books.

The more I read the more questions I have.

I once had a employer that always said that he didn't have time to read the Journal, new books, etc. He was too busy working... (very successful local arborist) The only new information that he gets is at CEU credit courses. Thank goodness for CEU requirement for certification.
I never understood how he could not have time to read.

I find that this forum and the ISA site are where I spend most of my efforts at continuing education. Maybe we should figure some way to get CEUs for board activity. That might create too much activity.
 
Report This Post
<Wayne Cahilly>
posted
Reply to post by Russ Carlson, on February 13, 1999 at 11:51:48:

Russ,

I think this can be summed up "sometimes I reads and thinks; and sometimes I just reads"

Add to the list, The Body Language of Trees by Claus Matheck which addresses the mechanical aspects of the tree where shigo addresses the physiologic tree.

Wayne
 
Report This Post
<Peter Torres>
posted
Reply to post by Robert Underwood, on February 13, 1999 at 11:51:48:

Several disease-related books:
Tree Disease Concepts- Paul Manion.
Principles of Forest Pathology- Tainter & Baker
Tree Diseases and Disorders- Butin.
The Plant Disease Clinic and Field Diagnosis of Abiotic Diseases - Shurtleff and Averre.
Trees and Development ... . Matheny & Clark.
 
Report This Post
<Bob Underwood>
posted
Reply to post by Bob Wulkowicz, on February 13, 1999 at 11:51:48:

Bob,

As you can see,the lean to the right has more to do with the flat tire than books and garbage in the cab.

Remember, we are talking about a ND College instructor's $300 special.

Donations may be sent to this address.

Bob U.
 
Report This Post
<Tom Dunlap>
posted
Reply to post by Robert Underwood, on February 13, 1999 at 11:51:48:

In addition to Bob U's:

The General Fundamentals of Treework-Beranek
Faith in a Seed-Thoreau (His last manuscript that was just published about 5 years ago. Very observant fellow!)
Arborist Equipment-Blair
On Rope-Smith and Padgett
The Ashley Book of Knots-Ashley
The Man Who Planted Trees-Giono

Tom
 
Report This Post
<Ed Milhous>
posted
Reply to post by Robert Underwood, on February 13, 1999 at 11:51:48:

I like George Hepting's Diseases of Forest and Shade Trees of the US (USDA Handbook #386).
 
Report This Post
<Peter Torres>
posted
Reply to post by Ed Milhous, on February 13, 1999 at 11:51:48:

I second that emotion. Might still be available from local USDA Forest Service offices for extremely cheap. Our tax dollars at work! Excellent reference list, dated, but fundamental.
 
Report This Post
<Russ Carlson>
posted
Reply to post by Peter Torres, on February 23, 1999 at 21:29:42:

it may be dated, Peter, but it's the only resource I could find that even mentioned boxelder staining.
 
Report This Post
<John S>
posted
Reply to post by Robert Underwood, on February 13, 1999 at 11:51:48:

Tree management was the first book, of the genre, I read umpteen years ago, and Iv'e reread it several times. And I have my helpers read it along with Mod. Arb.

Still saving up for the $100 for Arboriculture, Just spent $55 on the new Dirr not too long ago.
 
Report This Post
<Terry Ash>
posted
Reply to post by Robert Underwood, on February 13, 1999 at 11:51:48:

This is a late response but....in the midwest, Carl Whitcomb has written books addressing planting and maintenance of trees and shrubs which may be of interest. He is a former horticulture instructor at both Oklahoma State University the University of Florida.
 
Report This Post
  Powered by Social Strata  

Closed Topic Closed


© 1997-2003 Tree Tech Consulting. All messages are the property of the original author.