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<Aaron Atkinson>
posted
Where can i download the 9th edition as discussed in the appraisal class in Orlando.If anyone can give me any info i would appreciate it.p.s the class helped but as a two year arborist i need all the help i can get.I have been in the tree industry for 12 years but just got my arborist certification a couple of years ago,Thank you
 
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<Russ Carlson>
posted
Reply to post by Aaron Atkinson, on June 27, 2002 at 17:15:02:

Try this link:

https://www.appraisalfoundation.org/html/standards.asp?FileName=asb_uspap
 
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<Scott Cullen>
posted
Reply to post by Russ Carlson, on June 27, 2002 at 17:15:02:

Thanks Russ.

I should clarify that The Uniform Standards of Professional Appraisal Practice (USPAP) are published by the Appraisal Foundation, are downloadable and provide useful guidance to any appraiser of anything (real estate, antiques, cows...).

The 9th Edition Guide for Plant Appraisal is the generally accepted reference for landscape or amenity tree appraisal. It was written by the Council of Tree and Landscape Appraisers (CTLA) and is published by ISA. It is NOT downloadable and must be purchased in hard copy. If you do or intend to do appraisals it is a necessary, small investment.

The 9th Edition is a guide, not a standard, but even if you vary from the guide you should be familiar with it so you can explain and defend your departure from widely accepted practice.
 
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<Russ Carlson>
posted
Reply to post by Scott Cullen, on June 27, 2002 at 20:46:02:

Scott C wrote, "The 9th Edition is a guide, not a standard, but even if you vary from the guide you should be familiar with it so you can explain and defend your departure from widely accepted practice."

The operative work here is 'should.' It is not 'shall.' I've been in several situations where no one on either side of the bar were even aware of the Guide in any edition. So when we say "widely accepted," we mean by those who have some knowledge of the arboricultural industry. It doesn't mean it carries very beyond those bounds.
 
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<Scott>
posted
Reply to post by Russ Carlson, on June 28, 2002 at 06:43:16:

Yes, my advice regarding the 9th Edition was a "should," my recommendation. The Guide for Plant Appraisal is not widely known outside plant appraisal circles. But that's why courts admit experts! Some jurisdictions don't know about the Guide, some explicitly reject any replacement cost approach including those in the Guide, and some explicitly look to the Guide. But that was not my key point. "Generally accepted" means within a standard of care practiced by a body (not organization) of experts. Even though the Guide is only a guide and not a standard it is widely looked to within the industry. It is widely accepted.... errors, shortcomoings and all. There are experts who regard it as a standard and experts who explicitly apply (or misapply) every little hiccup and wart in the Guide. If you are opposed by one of those or just someone who knows about those Guide specifics and you appear to depart from the Guide and cannot explain why you can be made to appear to depart from "generally accepted" practice, to have your work characterized as "sub-standard" even though the Guide is not technically a standard. You might be presenting a better value opinion but if the other side "talks a better game" you can lose credibility.

There are experts out there who have stopped doing actual appraisals and act as consultant "appraisal killers" by looking at any way to pull apart somebody else's appraisal.

Understand I am NOT saying the Guide should be explicityly and universally followed. I fully understand there are errors in the Guide and situations the Guide does not address very well. I AM saying that when you depart from the Guide you should be able to fully explain and defend your departure.
 
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<Scott>
posted
Reply to post by Russ Carlson, on June 28, 2002 at 06:43:16:

Yes, my advice regarding the 9th Edition was a "should," my recommendation. The Guide for Plant Appraisal is not widely known outside plant appraisal circles. But that's why courts admit experts! Some jurisdictions don't know about the Guide, some explicitly reject any replacement cost approach including those in the Guide, and some explicitly look to the Guide. But that was not my key point. "Generally accepted" means within a standard of care practiced by a body (not organization) of experts. Even though the Guide is only a guide and not a standard it is widely looked to within the industry. It is widely accepted.... errors, shortcomoings and all. There are experts who regard it as a standard and experts who explicitly apply (or misapply) every little hiccup and wart in the Guide. If you are opposed by one of those or just someone who knows about those Guide specifics and you appear to depart from the Guide and cannot explain why you can be made to appear to depart from "generally accepted" practice, to have your work characterized as "sub-standard" even though the Guide is not technically a standard. You might be presenting a better value opinion but if the other side "talks a better game" you can lose credibility.

There are experts out there who have stopped doing actual appraisals and act as consultant "appraisal killers" by looking at any way to pull apart somebody else's appraisal.

Understand I am NOT saying the Guide should be explicityly and universally followed. I fully understand there are errors in the Guide and situations the Guide does not address very well. I AM saying that when you depart from the Guide you should be able to fully explain and defend your departure.

As an aside... there are provisions in USPAP that are "SHALLS." There are shalls that are "binding," i.e. there are NO departures. USPAP does not explicitly govern plant appraisal becasue no industry organizations have signed onto it and to my knowwledge no jurisdcitions or regulatory environments impose it on plant appraisal. The isue is whether some things are so basic to a professional appraisal process that credibility suggests we should be following those "shall" provisions of USPAP as if are USPAP governed.
 
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<Philip A Bjorkman>
posted
Reply to post by Scott, on July 05, 2002 at 18:14:18:

USPAP has provisions for departures. Certain Standard Rules do not permit departures, specifically, SR1-1, SR1-2, SR1-5, SR2-1, SR2-2, Sr2-3. "The burden of proof is squarely on the shoulders of the appraiser to determine when departure is acceptable." To depart the appraiser has to determine that the appraisal or consulting process to be performed is not so limited that the results of the assignment are no longer credible. Tkhe appraiser has advised the client that the assignment calls for something less than or different from the work required by the specific USPAP requirements and that the report will clearly identify and explain the departure. The client must agree that the performance of a limited appraisal or consulting service would be appropriate given the intended use. Today every jusrisdiction has by statute a licensing/certification program in operation. USPAP has been incorporated in the statutes that created the state licensing and certification of appraisers. While as Registered Professional Foresters who produce appraisals of timber stands, severable real property, we do adhere to USPAP, I think that the arborist using the ISA appraisal guidelines would really have to look to each State and their appraisal statutes to get an idea weather or not USPAP applies to them. Just my opinion. Phil Bjorkman RPF 1671 ISA WC6122.
 
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<Scott>
posted
Reply to post by Philip A Bjorkman, on July 06, 2002 at 05:52:02:

Good points Phillip. I agree, the stautory or regulatory application of USPAP may vary by state. In those states that limit tree value to some component of land value that might mean that only a licensed or certified r.e. appriaser can appriase trees and then USPAP will apply. Some years ago Jim Ingram obtained an opinion from the Appraisal Foundation which promugates USPAP that trees were more in the manner of personal property and not subject to the appraisal provisons of the Code of Federal regulations applying to real estate appraisals in federally regulated transactions. All that mumbo jumbo means that state licensing of r.e. apprasiers grew out of banking reform after the S&L collapses and other bank failures of the late 80's. USPAP came out of that too. Notwithstanding the fedrally regulated transactions stuff preexisting state law may much more frequently tie trees to the land.

In any case my point was that USPAP covers r.e., personal property and business appraisal. Whether or not the law applies USPAP to tree apprasial. if we want to be perceived as professionals it makes great sense to follow USPAP where applicable simply becasue it is the reasonable standard of care for professional apprasial. I really don't like this notion that "oh we're tree guys and trees are different so we don't have to be as professional." That's a crutch and an invitation to skepticism by apprasial users.
 
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