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In many states anyone who gets an occupational license and city license can lay claim to being a professional tree person without any proof of competency,education or years of internship. Electricians, plumbers, ect need proof, why not the field of arboriculture? Who needs to be influenced in state or local governments? What must be done to put the AX to the hackers?
 
Posts: 4 | Location: Melbourne, Fl | Registered: Tuesday February 08, 2005Report This Post
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The tree industry may be too young to accept such rigid boundaries unless the laws can be enforced. all restrictions only impose more pressure on those who comply but do not affect the 'cowboy' element. I'm not saying there is an answer but I would like to think that local authorities should in a way 'subsidise' tree work for providing more money to pay quality contractors, to set an example.
 
Posts: 56 | Location: Auckland, NZ | Registered: Monday March 28, 2005Report This Post
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Kit Twinch ---- Yes it is ture that the tree industry is young, but is that not the time to establish rules and regulations, just as it is with children? I do not see implications of pressure for those who comply, I only see gradatude! What is the 'cowboy element' you are refering to? Local authorities subsidising tree work? Not in the USA. That is why authorities need to establish firm laws so the professional can get his or her professional fee for hard work they do. The professional arborist (certified) is setting the example but the road that educates is very, very long.
 
Posts: 4 | Location: Melbourne, Fl | Registered: Tuesday February 08, 2005Report This Post
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True but at what stage is the child able to understand the rules and regulations. Compliance with rules and regulations invariably costs money therefore making the people compliant less competetive in an open market. By 'subsidise' I mean local authorities having more finances to carry out the same amount of work, thereby being able to pay quality contractors to not only support them but champion best practice. What other support does the industry have? If this is not achievable how is the harder task of enforcement going to be carried out? I agree totally with your sentiments but if the social and economic structure is conducive then the demand for quality arboriculture will come rather than having to be forced. The 'cowboy element' is terminology for tree cutters who are easy in easy out, low overheads, cash in hand, no scruples or education.....hard to stop. Education of the public will help create a demand not only for private tree work of a high standard but for public spaces. The road to education is a rocky road for arboriculture as we are not always sure of our benchmarks of best practice, the flush cut is not yet a distant memory. More independent research is needed, but where does the funding come from? sadly often from the most hard working again. An affiliation to a professional body is one small step forward, here we have mainly the Arboricultural Association, but also perhaps this correspondence itself is a small step forward in itself.
 
Posts: 56 | Location: Auckland, NZ | Registered: Monday March 28, 2005Report This Post
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OK, I concur! Your insite to the political scene is far more advanced than mine. I would hope that the ISA or NAA may someday have commercials that will be shown national wide so people can be awakened to reality of the arboricultural world and the people who preform in it!!!
 
Posts: 4 | Location: Melbourne, Fl | Registered: Tuesday February 08, 2005Report This Post
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