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<Paul Hawksford>
posted
What are your feelings on mycorrhiza inoculation to abate soil compaction and improve soil structure around trees. Trials are on-going at Kew Botanical Gardens in London, the data has been made available, but limited, in the UK press. More info - simply e-mail me.

UK/I Chapter ISA are running a number of events (May/June 1999) involving, mycorrhiza inoculation demonstrations, along with other PHC issues. See AMIUG homepage - "Crack 10".
Downloaded copies will be made available to you shortly and on request from Tree-Tech visitors. Just let me know!

Paul H.
 
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<Peter Torres>
posted
Reply to post by Paul Hawksford, on April 16, 1999 at 18:23:11:

Paul, I believe that soil compaction kills mycorrhizal-forming fungi, the mycorrhizas themselves, and the associated fine roots. Using inoculations cannot hurt, because it is organic material, which resists compaction, and to a small extent, ameliorates. But it is probably going to have an insignificant p-value for abating compaction. The same parameters that killed the mycorrhizas in the first place will kill the inoculated fungi, I believe. Peter
 
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<Nathaniel Sperry>
posted
Reply to post by Paul Hawksford, on April 16, 1999 at 18:23:11:

Please put me on your list., Thanks
 
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<Peter Torres>
posted
Reply to post by Paul Hawksford, on April 16, 1999 at 18:23:11:

Thanks for the info you sent, Paul. I'd say it looks like a very good case for inoculating trees in the nursery and for outplanting.
I think the idea of soil compaction amelioration is an entirely separate issue.
I agree with Duane Pancoast in the April 1999 issue of Arborist News (ISA). He wrote:

Although the author makes the common error that mycorrhizae are living organisms, which I disagree with, the points seem valid to me.
 
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<Peter Torres>
posted
Reply to post by Peter Torres, on April 16, 1999 at 18:23:11:

Strangely, the quote disappeared so I will add it here.
He wrote:
"Most "healthy" soils contain plenty of mycorrhizae and need no supplements. Some landscape soils, however, have been scraped, depleting the mycorrhizae; such soils may benefit from an application."
"But you cannot just throw mycorrhizae into mycorrhizae-deficient soil and expect results. Mycorrhizae are living organisms that need oxygen, moisture, and organic matter. If the soil is compacted, dry, or contaminated, these fungi will die."
 
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<Scott Cullen>
posted
Reply to post by Peter Torres, on April 16, 1999 at 18:23:11:

If memory serves, Duane Pancoast is a publicist not an arborist or scientist. So this brings up a cautionary point about relying on 'technical' articles which are really intended to increase awareness rather than to provide technical precision.
 
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<Peter Torres>
posted
Reply to post by Scott Cullen, on April 27, 1999 at 21:35:45:

Correct, the author made no claims to be a scientist. And wew know that this particular ISA mag is not a refereed journal.
I agree with Duane's statement. like I said.
Another author that seems to support this position is A. Shigo.
 
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<Nelda Matheny>
posted
Reply to post by Peter Torres, on May 02, 1999 at 06:50:56:

Mychorrizae are not a soil remediation treatment. They require the same conditions that roots do: moisture, warmth, oxygen, mineral elements, etc. Therefore, it is unreasonable to expect them to survive in a compacted environment in which root growth is poor.
 
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<Bernie>
posted
What if you used this in combination with other soil conditioning techniques such as vertical mulching, pressurised air, coreing, applying gypsum,mulching,organic ferts,liquid kelp extracts,molasis treatments and so on.
 
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Doing anything in moderation is better than leaving everything to suffocate. Apply what method you think is best with relevance to the specific situation until all the money has run out.
 
Posts: 56 | Location: Auckland, NZ | Registered: Monday March 28, 2005Report This Post
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