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<Ken Six>
posted
Does anyone have any cost comparisons for clearing and grubbing vs. selective tree removal by hand? How much more does it cost to try to save trees on a development site? This would be from a developers point of veiw.From an arborist's point of veiw in regards only to tree removal (not common sense) would it be pay me now or pay me later?
Thanks, Ken
 
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<Paul H>
posted
Reply to post by Ken Six, on July 27, 1998 at 08:31:10:


A difficult scenario, given that I do not really understand your question. At a guess, tree value and protective measures vs. tree removal. Cost implications would mean loss of a potential property vs. loss of the tree. Way the cost for each and you have your answer. In amenity terms some trees can be worth many more thousands of dollars than the property value.

Further clarification of your question would be appreciated.

Paul H.
 
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<Bill Camper>
posted
Reply to post by Ken Six, on July 27, 1998 at 08:31:10:

Ken: Could you please clarify the statment
from an arborists point of view and(not common
sense). Thanks Bill
 
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<Torrey Young>
posted
Reply to post by Ken Six, on July 27, 1998 at 08:31:10:

Ken... if I understand your questions(s) correctly... you are seeking information on the financial comparisons of preserving trees on a development site versus clear-cutting the site... and the same perspectives on the market perspective for an arborist.

If you haven't already... purchase Matheny & Clark's "Trees and Development" (from ISA). From that publication... "Trees are preserved because it is in the developer's best interest to do so." Can't say it better than that!

Tree preservation increases property values and improves the developer's relationships with the governing agencies and the general public.

As far as the market effect for arborists is concerned...

- the public perceives a company related to tree preservation mor positivly than related to demolition
- preservation efforts develop a consulting market
- tree removal is a one-shot project, while preservation ensures a long-term patient
- comprehensive consulting in the planning stage may result in both preservation work and removal work for trees identified as not viable for preservation
- a long-term relationship may lead to maintenance work with both the developer and the future residents
- unfortunately... the reality is you may remove many of the "preserved" trees alter anyway!

Unfortunately, in many cases emphasis is placed on preservation of mature trees that will inevitably decline from the impact of construction, when the survival and improvement of the urban forest (and the general public) would be better served to focus on appropriate replacements. Never-the-less... as pertains to your queries... a market is created in the process for arborists.

Hope these thoughts help!

Torrey

P.S.: OK you guys... don't give me a lot of moralistic reactions about preserving historic trees... I was just responding to his specifc questions!

TY
 
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<Ken Six>
posted
Reply to post by Ken Six, on July 27, 1998 at 08:31:10:

Bill I reread my question and it confused me. What I was trying to say Torrey pretty much summed it up. From some developers points of veiw down here it's all about dollars and cents.
I am trying to implement programs such as in Matheny & Clark's "Trees and Development". I am on my 3rd read through. Even though it's common sense and in the developers best interest I seem to be up against years of other "Tree Experts" Preserving trees like This: During construction or after grading has been done, a tree expert is called in and he recomends to first lion tail the tree and makes sure the cuts are good and flush, then fertilize, then put up some form of barrier about 5 or 6 ft from the trunk (that is usually used to lay materials on or park)Then that's it. Then comes the plumbers, sidewalk, driveway, and then to add insult to injury the poor tree is landscaped at the base with about 1 foot of mulch and some azeleas planted. Oh, I almost forgot, Irrigation. We all know the rest of the story. So at this time here the developers are a little skeptical when this guy called a Certified Arborist comes up. They always say a certified what? What's that.
Thanks for letting me get that out!
Ken
 
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<Paul H>
posted
Reply to post by Ken Six, on July 27, 1998 at 08:31:10:


Design and Development - Arboricultural Implication Study prior to construction.

A development window allowing construction in proximity to vegetation, without conflict and following detailed analysis of the many variables.

Pre not Post.

Paul H.
 
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<Nelda Matheny>
posted
Reply to post by Ken Six, on July 27, 1998 at 08:31:10:

Yes, it is frustrating to try to change the tide. Things don't always go accoriding to advice in the book, do they? All I can suggest is what has worked for us over the last 15 years. Educate and convert your clients and colleagues on the development team one person at a time. Bit by bit they will see that doing a proper job pays off. It's a gradual process that we cannot hurry through. Expect small steps instead of bit leaps.
For some cost estimates of money saved/spent saving trees, you might refer to "Building Greener Neighborhoods" produced by American Forests.
Good luck!
Nelda
 
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<Hopcraft Ian John>
posted
Reply to post by Ken Six, on July 27, 1998 at 08:31:10:

Cost of hire,erection, maintenance and removal of 'BRITISH STANDARD 5837' type fencing for one six month period is in the region of £40 per meter for 1.2m high fence and £50 per meter for the 2.4m high fence. Figures based on a written quote from scaffolding contractor in April 2000.
 
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